Branding to Kids

With the spooky Halloween fun now done and dusted, and Christmas just around the corner, it’s a busy time for retailers.  Just walking along the high street, there’s an overwhelming amount of brands in shop windows targeted at kids ready for Christmas.  Marketers are competing against each other to tap into ‘pester power’ – a marketing concept to trigger kids into pestering their parents to buy toys, games or products in question.

A good brand tends to have a strong presence starting with a visually appealing logo for its target audience to connect, resonate and build trust with.  We all recognise or have heard of the McDonalds yellow arches; Nike’s dynamic tick; the child-like innocence of Peppa Pig‘s brand; and LEGO‘s link to creative building experiences.  This is the power of branding.

Millions of kids enjoy watching ‘Ryan’s Toy Review’ on YouTube where youngmaxresdefault (1).jpg subscribers see Ryan having fun playing with promoted toys brands. Rightly or wrongly, this is ‘pester power’ in action and big business for brands.  I personally am all for branding, but in moderation. There needs to be a healthy and regulated balance with what kids see on commercial platforms.

Today, children are exposed to too much too soon which creates a needy culture of consumerism at a very early age.  Many kids are losing touch with the value of simple things and constantly crave more of the latest trendy toys and gadgets, putting increased pressure on parents to pay for them.  This also can have an impact on kids’ social interactions and self-esteem by competing to keep up with each other. However, on the other hand, increased exposure to brands can in some cases have a positive impact on kids, when promoting emotional well-being, healthy living and mindfulness e.g. ChildLine and Relax Kids.

With this in mind, I decided to experiment and create a simple kids logo to see the reaction and probe into how it made parents and kids feel.  I used Logojoy, an easy to use website programmed with artificial intelligence to create logos.  First, I inserted a company name and slogan, chose a logo template and then let Logojoy work its magic. Next, I was given a range of logo options and I picked one I liked.  I was quite surprised at how easy it was to create the logo and had fun playing around with the different options on this website.  After a bit tweaking and editing here and there from my side, this the outcome:

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When I showed my logo from Logojoy to 4 groups of parents and said it was for a new fictional toy shop, the general consensus was positive, particularly the vibrant colour, but it lacked familiarity so they’d be more inclined to be loyal to their current brand by sticking with them, unless there were some big promotions on offer.  I then asked a group of 13 year olds what they thought and they questioned what games would be sold because to some the icon looked like the toy shop was for younger kids but the actual design looked like products could be for older kids.  This was quite interesting kids brandingand good fun to listen to the feedback whilst delving into the mindset and motivators of brand consumers.

The saying “all that glitters, is not gold” reminds us how important it is to appreciate what we already have and not be swayed by the latest trend or fad.  So with Christmas looming and big brands doing their best to capture your child’s attention, I hope this post inspires you to remind your child to take a step back and appreciate the simple things in life. This can be by donating any unwanted toys or items to charity, showing compassion for others less fortunate and remembering to always be grateful.

Yours truly,

Miss H 🌟

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